SOLYMONE BLOG

HECTARES OF PHILIPPINES CORAL REEF DESTROYED BY POACHERS


MANILA, Philippines - Poachers destroyed about 7,000 hectares of coral reef in Moro Gulf and Sulu Sea in the south Philippines when they harvested more than 21,000 pieces of black corals, which were seized by customs authorities in Manila two weeks ago, a local paper said.
"One reef complex - twice the size of Manila district - was decimated. It was like a forest that has been cut down," Ludivina Labe, a senior marine biologist of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (Bfar) told the Inquirer.
  • The size of the damaged coral complex in the south was computed on the number of contraband that was seized in Manila's port area two weeks ago, and the assumption that only one black coral could be harvested from two of three colonies of black corals that cover about one hectare of seabed, explained Labe, adding that thousands of other marine organisms live in coral colonies.
  • Since corals grow one centimetre a month, it would take more than 25 years to grow the size of the damaged coral colony, said Labe.
  • Two weeks ago officials of the Bureau of Customs were shocked to find from two container vans that were supposed to carry rubbers, 134 bundles or 21,169 pieces, of "sea fan" black corals; and 15 bundles, or 196 kilograms, of "sea whip" black corals.
  • The van also contained 7,300 pieces of sea shells and 161 endangered turtles. One turtle that was found dead was 40 inches long, estimated to be 80 to 100 years old. There were also four-year old turtles. The entire contraband was estimated at P 35 million (Dh 2.91 million).
  • The irreparable poaching occurred at Moro Gulf and the Sulu Sea off Cotabato, long declared as Marine Parks and should have been protected areas, lamented Labe.
  • When customs officials turned over the seized contraband to officials of BFAR and the department of environment and natural resources on Tuesday, environment officials said the black corals could be returned later to the sea; the dead turtles and other endangered marine species would be given to schools.
  • The World Wildlife Fund estimated the environmental destruction brought about by this particular incident between $137,000 and $1,200,000.
Many environmentalists believe that country's Fisheries Code of 1998, which bans the gathering and selling of corals, should be amended because violation of the code carries imprisonment from six months to two years and a fine from P2,000 to P20,000 . The Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora has banned the harvesting of black corals, which are sought by makers of exotic jewellery.
Source: Agency
0 comments:

VISITORS DETAIL LOCATION

VISITORS GEOFLAGS SINCE AUGUST 26, 2009

SABAH, MALAYSIAN BORNEO - THE LAND BELOW THE WIND

CITY OF KOTA KINABALU, SABAH-MALAYSIAN BORNEO

Translate

DREAM ON

TIME IN MALAYSIA

TOTAL PAGES VIEW SINCE 30 DAYS AGO

TRANSLATE TO YOUR LANGUAGE

Solymone

My photo
Tenghilan, TUARAN, Sabah, Malaysia

MY FACEBOOK

VISITORS LOCATION GLOBE

VISITORS NATIONAL FLAG

VISITORS GEOFLAGS BY CITY

WHY I KEEP RE-VISITING SABAH

WHY I KEEP RE-VISITING SABAH
Clicks To Read

IINTERNATIONAL BLOGSPOT

BLOG ARCHIVE

MALAYSIAN BORNEO BLOGGERS

MALAYSIAN BORNEO BLOGGERS

...................................................................

...................................................................
MALAYSIAN
Blog Widget by LinkWithin